Plug in the USB-Serial Port adaptor to one of your USB port, wait for a couple of second, then run:

[pensacola@pensacola-tech ~]#dmesg

The output should be something like this:

usb 2.0: new full speed USB device using uhci_and address 2

usb 2.0: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice

Then unplug the device and type:

[pensacola@pensacola-tech ~]#lsusb

The output should be similar to this:

Bus 003 Device 001: ID 0000:0000

Bus 002 Device 007: ID 03f0:4f11 Hewlett-Packard

Bus 002 Device 006: ID 05e3:1205

Bus 002 Device 004: ID 15d9:0a33

Plug in the USB-Serial Port converter back, and run “lsusb” again, and you will see
an additional line, like this:

Bus 003 Device 001: ID 0000:0000

Bus 002 Device 007: ID 03f0:4f11 Hewlett-Packard

Bus 001 Device 002: ID 4348:5523 — — — the additional line

Bus 002 Device 006: ID 05e3:1205

Bus 002 Device 004: ID 15d9:0a33

At this point we have the vendor id and the product id of the USB-Serial Port converter, this will enable us to load the linux kernel module “usbserial” to activate the device.
[pensacola@pensacola-tech ~]#sudo modprobe usbserial vendor=0x4348 product=0x5523

After that run again:

[pensacola@pensacola-tech ~]#dmesg

… the output:

usbserial_generic 2.0:1.0: generic converter detected

usb 2.0: generic converter now attached to ttyUSB0

usbcore: registered new interface driver usbserial_generic

Now, the new serial port device is mapped to /dev/ttyUSB0.

Note:  You can instruct Ubuntu to load this module automatically by include the line :  “usbserial vendor=0×4348 product=0×5523 inside “/etc/modules” file.

Here is a simple way to backup your svn repository. Use the following command:

svnadmin dump /repository_path/project > /backup_path/project_backup

 You can test if this is okay by creating a test repository and importing the backup
file to the new test repository.

svnadmin create /repository_path/project1
svnadmin load /repository_path/project1 < /project_backup/project

 After that you cand remove it.

rm -rf /repository_path/project1

 In the end you can create a zip copy to the backup file project_backup
to project_backup.zip.

zip -r project_backup.zip project_backup
01. June 2010 · 2 comments · Categories: Linux

Under the WP admin option menu, WordPress lists four choices for permalink structure:

  1. Default: http://pensacola-tech.com/pensacola/?=123
  2. Date and name based: http://pensacola-tech.com/pensacola/2010/05/10/sample-post/
  3. Numeric: http://pensacola-tech.com/pensacola/archives/123
  4. Custom: /%year%/%monthnum%/%day%/%postname%

Note: The “default” option is to not use permalinks.

There are 2 htaccess rules for all WordPress permalinks:

1. If WordPress is installed in the root directory:

# BEGIN WordPress
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /index.php [L]
</IfModule>
# END WordPress

2. If WordPress is installed in a subdirectory called "pensacola"


# BEGIN WordPress
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /pensacola/
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /pensacola/index.php [L]
</IfModule>
# END WordPress

That's it... :)Enjoy!

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