09. June 2010 · 2 comments · Categories: Linux

Here is a step by step on how to set up shared folders for accessing Windows folders in a Linux guest. VirtualBox Shared Folders on inactive virtual machines are configured through the Settings dialog. This dialog is accessed by selecting the desired virtual machine from the list and clicking the Settings button in the toolbar. Once the settings dialog is displayed, click on the Shared Folders entry to display something like this:

To add a new shared folder, click on the add folder button (the top button containing an icon of a folder with a green plus sign) and select a folder on the host system to be shared with the selected guest. To browse for a specific folder, click the down arrow in the Folder Path text box and select Other… from the drop down menu. Once a suitable folder has been selected, enter a name for the share in the Folder Name field. If the guest operating system is to be denied write access to the folder, ensure that the Read-only check box is selected before clicking the OK button to create the share. Once the shared folder has been configured, start the virtual machine to access the folder.

Shared folders may be configured on a running virtual machine by selecting the Devices->Shared Folders.. menu of the virtual machine window. It will be something like this:

Add a new shared folder by clicking on the add folder button (the top button containing an icon of a folder with a green plus sign) and select a folder on the host system to be shared with the selected guest.

Shared Folders are accessed on Linux guests by mounting the folder at a suitable mount point using the mount command. This can either be an existing directory, or a new directory may be created specifically for this purpose. Use this command: sudo mount -t vboxsf share ~/host

E.g

[pensacola@pensacola-tech ~]#sudo mkdir /media/shared_folder

[pensacola@pensacola-tech ~]#sudo mount -t vboxsf shared_folder /media/shared_folder

The files are now accessible in /media/shared_folder.

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